Get ready to delight your eyes with something crazy at MLSU

As some wise man said, “Art is something that doesn’t need to be confined within four walls, it’ll be as great as it is allowed to fly.”

Today, too many people try to come up with a contemporary art definition but it’s quite a troublesome task. While its title is simplistic and straightforward, its modern-day meaning is not precise. Fortunately, understanding what constitutes as “contemporary” is entirely possible once when one traces the concept’s history and explores its underlying themes.

What is contemporary art?

In the most basic sense, the term contemporary art refers to art mainly, painting, sculpture, photography, installation, performance, and video art today. Though seemingly simple, the details surrounding this definition are often a bit fuzzy, as different individuals’ interpretations of “today” may widely and vividly vary.

The Department of Visual Arts is one of such esteemed institutions which is providing the students with a world-class education in the field of visual arts. The department has successfully completed its 50 years. Some of the prominent professors of Rajasthan Contemporary Art are its alumni and the department is still operating under their high-class experience.

Various open art workshops are organized where the renowned artists from all around the globe and hardworking students get a chance to showcase their talents. One such workshop is ‘Udaipur Spring’19’ which is organized by the department.

The event consisted of 2 workshops, the canvas painting workshop was organized from 24th to 28th Feb 2019 whereas 19th to 28th was the workshop for scrap sculpture workshop.

40 Canvas painting and 10 Modern Art Scrap Sculpture were made during the workshop. The sculptures and the paintings that were made during the 10-day workshop speaks for the event’s success itself. Everyone was eager to contribute their bit to create something exemplary. Regardless of gender, female students showed some exemplary skills as well.

Around 50 eminent artists from all over the globe were invited to take part in the 10-day workshop

2 International Artists, 10 National Artists and 32 to 35 alumni’s of the department participated in the event.

The Artists were:

  • Clemens Sou, Vienna
  • Katherine Karlsoon, Denmark
  • Bhupesh Kavdia, Naseem Ahmed, Dinesh Upadhyay, Sandeep Paliwal, Rokesh Kumar Singh – Udaipur
  • Alay Mistri, Arpit Biloriya, Tahir Merchant – Ahmedabad
  • Hansraj Kumawat, Jaipur
  • Gagan Bihari Dhadich, Nathdwara

Prof. Hemant Dwivedi head of the Department of Visual Arts, MLSU wishes to carry forward the legacy which has been bestowed in his hand and also plans to organize an International Camp very soon.

 

If you like to share something or have feedback for us, Feel free to share with us on mohit@vivirmedia.com

The Silversmiths of Udaipur | Forgotten Artists of The City

A city is made up of the people that live in it. Udaipur is made up of artists! Be it the narrow alleys or the wide marketplaces, the City of Lakes is flooded with artisans in various fields that entice and awe-inspire travelers from all across the globe. Whether it is wooden toys or zinc furniture or handmade jewelry, everything here is indigenous and from the very roots of the city.

One such community of artists is the Silversmiths. Living in the tapered lanes of the Old City of Udaipur, you will find a number of small ‘Chabutra’ style shops that are business places to one of the most creative people I say. These are the Silversmiths.

I am a fan of silver jewelry, and just in the search for some customized silver ornaments I met this person some 4-5 years back and since then he is my fave!

A couple days back I decided to have a small interview (more of an impromptu chat, like I, always have with him). He mainly does repairing work and has stopped making ornaments. While, if insisted he makes ornaments. He also does piercings in nose, ears etc.

I believe that these people deserve the acknowledgment of their art. Their ways and techniques are old but that’s what the essence of their work is. He makes the smallest and tiniest pieces of silver jewelry by hand and each one is unique in its true sense.

I always get things customized for myself and he does that without losing his patience on me!! (*laughs*)

We asked him to make two nose pins that we could buy. Here, is a small video of him making the two nose pins and talking to us regarding his work. Let’s meet Mr. Yash Kumar Soni.

 

You can Contact them at:

Yash Kumar Soni: +91-9314937509

Bhupesh Soni: +91- 9887112889

Address: Laxmilaal and Sons (Kundan Art Works), Ganesh Ghati, Old City, Udaipur

Also, if you know any person or a community who indulges in some indigenous and ancient art of any kind, do write to me at fouzia@udaipurblog.com
I would love to hear their story!

The 300 Years Old ‘Jal Sanjhi Art’ Is Something Every Udaipurite Must Know!

Udaipur is well-known for lakes and natural beauty of its landscape. The Old city of Udaipur is a hub of various art forms that are unique to Udaipur. Local artists create these paintings and sculptures following traditions of their forefathers. To relive these cultures one has to visit these areas to have a glimpse of the folk customs from their own eyes.

One such art form is ‘Sanjhi’.

This exclusive art form where the canvas is not any cloth or paper, but sheer water is called Jal Sanjhi.  Sanjhi is made from the patripada to Amavasya of Ashwin for fifteen days but the preparations start a day earlier on Bhado Purnima.

As one legend says, these paintings came into origin when Lord Krishna’s image was seen in the water by ‘Radha’ in a pond, and the image was outlined with flowers to make a picture of the Lord. Since then it has evolved as Sanjhi which are made to honor the Lord Krishna’s ‘Leela’ in the form of pictorial depiction on water.

In accordance with the above information, Sanjhi paintings are made complimenting Lord Krishna before the onset of the festive season of Navratri. Over 300 years old, this rare art has been kept alive by just a family in Udaipur, who has been practicing it for generations now.

The 300 Years Old ‘Jal Sanjhi Art’ Is Something Every Udaipurite Must Know!

Rajesh Pancholi is the artist that we came in contact; the family has been practicing this art since generations and as per his nephew, Gunjan Pancholi, he is the fourth generation practicing and observing this art.

How are these paintings made?

As described by the Pancholi family and what I watched, I am going to describe it for all you curious people.

We searched for the family and finally got to know where they stay. We waited for the month before the onset of the Navratri season so that we could see it happening in front of us.

As per Gunjan, this art was started in Mathura by his ancestors. These paintings were earlier created for 15 days but due to lack of interest of people and rising inflation (the colors have become expensive), it is quite difficult for them to meet the expenses.

The tale of Lord Krishna with the ‘Shesh Naag’ known as the Naag Leela is what we watched, step by step. It took around three and a half hours to complete the entire painting- floating on clear water.

First and foremost the water is treated one night prior and then placed in a huge vessel where it is made to settle. Once settled, a base color is made to float on water.  The base color is spread on the water by the use of a fine sieve little by little. The colors are true stone colors which are used after processing, which turns them turn into a fine powder and increases the ease of use.

The 300 Years Old ‘Jal Sanjhi Art’ Is Something Every Udaipurite Must Know!
Outline Stencil

After the completion of the base (generally white color), the stencils are kept cautiously on the base to execute the process.The 300 Years Old ‘Jal Sanjhi Art’ Is Something Every Udaipurite Must Know!

Now talking of the stencils, these used by the Pancholi family are made from thin rice papers and are almost 300 years old. Their forefathers drew on them and cut them. These stencils are preserved by the family and used till date.

One by one these stencils is kept gently on the base color taking reference points. Slowly and gradually the painting emerges into its full shape and exquisiteness. For each step, there is one stencil, even for the flowers and ornamentation. It took 9 stencils to complete the Naag Leela. The last stencil was just for the outline. Real flower petals and sparkles also are included in embellishing the painting.

The 300 Years Old ‘Jal Sanjhi Art’ Is Something Every Udaipurite Must Know!

After Jal Sanjhi being made for three days, the fourth day a more elaborate Sanjhi is made of wood, which carries more intricate work of colors and stencils. The fifth day again marks a creation of Jal Sanjhi. It is a must see!

I was enthralled by the finesse, precision, and patience these artists have. Their hands work very tenderly creating a very fragile art. The beauty lies in the details and the delicacy with which they perform this sacred ritual of creating a divine folk art.

Wanna see these paintings?

Jal Sanjhi is a delight for every art lover. These paintings are open for public viewing every evening at their temple in the Old City during the course of the ‘Shrad Paksha’.

The wood Sanjhi will be made on 19 September 2017. You can visit and see this amazing art form live! Let us know if you went and watched the Sanjhi Art Form.

Address:  Shri Radha Vallab Ji Mandir, 14 Jagdish Mandir Road.

Time: 7 pm to 10 pm

Have a look at this amazing painting!

The 300 Years Old ‘Jal Sanjhi Art’ Is Something Every Udaipurite Must Know!

The 300 Years Old ‘Jal Sanjhi Art’ Is Something Every Udaipurite Must Know!

The 300 Years Old ‘Jal Sanjhi Art’ Is Something Every Udaipurite Must Know!

The 300 Years Old ‘Jal Sanjhi Art’ Is Something Every Udaipurite Must Know!

The 300 Years Old ‘Jal Sanjhi Art’ Is Something Every Udaipurite Must Know!

The 300 Years Old ‘Jal Sanjhi Art’ Is Something Every Udaipurite Must Know!

The 300 Years Old ‘Jal Sanjhi Art’ Is Something Every Udaipurite Must Know!

 

Beautiful Pictures Captured by Siddharth Nagar

The Dialysis – to Purify the Things

Since aeons, theatre has always been a strong medium of entertaining people while confronting them with reality. And reality can sometimes leave you amidst a cyclone of thoughts. One such burning truth was raised in the play “Court Martial” which was beautifully written by Swadesh Deepak and executed by a team of young and talented artists under the able direction of Shivraj Sonwal. Occasion was of World Theatre Day and the stage was of Sukhadia Rangmanch at Town Hall. With a very noble cause of ailing a very senior theatre artist Mr. Rizwan Zahir Usman, who is suffering from a severe kidney disease, this play was dedicated to him who had been a source of inspiration for many.

 Mr. Rizwan Zahir Usman_Court Martial_Udaipur_theatre

The play takes you to an army court where a case has been presented for trial. Accused is Jawan Ramchandar who has been accused of killing one officer and grievously hurting the other. The court is presided by Colonel Sooraj Singh, a brave army personnel who has confronted death many a times in battle field. The trial at the court puts him in a confusing situation where he has to decide between moral judgment and legal judgment. At the end, despite of getting death sentence, the accused wins over the victim.

 Mr. Rizwan Zahir Usman_Court Martial_Udaipur_theatre

 Mr. Rizwan Zahir Usman_Court Martial_Udaipur_theatre

 Mr. Rizwan Zahir Usman_Court Martial_Udaipur_theatre

 Mr. Rizwan Zahir Usman_Court Martial_Udaipur_theatre

 Mr. Rizwan Zahir Usman_Court Martial_Udaipur_theatre

 Mr. Rizwan Zahir Usman_Court Martial_Udaipur_theatre

 Mr. Rizwan Zahir Usman_Court Martial_Udaipur_theatre

 Mr. Rizwan Zahir Usman_Court Martial_Udaipur_theatre

 Mr. Rizwan Zahir Usman_Court Martial_Udaipur_theatre

 Mr. Rizwan Zahir Usman_Court Martial_Udaipur_theatre

The play forces us to put a question on the society in which we live; a society that proudly tags itself as ‘modern’. But a bitter truth is that some narrow-minded people form a part of it or rather I should say the most respected part of this society. These so-called ‘High Class People’ forcefully take away the pride and esteem of people merely on the basis of caste. Yes, crimes were committed, are committed and will continue to be committed by them against low caste people and against the whole society and humanity when tried at a larger scale. And the ‘point to be noted’ is that this prevails even in The Indian Army which does not hold any system of reservation at any of its ranks and positions. Sounds shocking but true!!

Photos by : Yash Sharma